In My Mother's Womb

2019-11-05 06:26:22

We are super excited to be presenting the acclaimed, In My Mother's Womb, at the State Theatre in Pretoria on the 25th November 2019.

In My Mother's Womb offers an intimate look into what it is like to live with blindness. Drawing from personal stories of the inter-generational cast of youngsters and the elderly, Dlamini challenges the audience to suspend the privilege of sight and use other senses to experience how the blind perceive the world. To awaken one's spirituality, Dlamini says we all need to crawl back to our mother's womb and acknowledge our complex existence. She experiments with the womb as the metaphor of darkness and asks the following questions: does one live with generational curses? Does the spirit world exist? Can hope keep one alive? Can tragedy turn into a blessing? Dlamini says "we learn the true meaning of dreams and hope through the blind. They can touch what we cannot. After every rehearsal of this work I ask myself, what kind of world could we inhabit if we all took the time to understand the world's forgotten senses." Through the exploration of blindness, this play is an example of the endless possibilities of how one can express oneself differently in the absence of sight.
The performing arts programme of the Outreach Foundation has, over the years, rooted its work thematically, addressing current and relevant social issues that impact our participants and their communities. The programme is committed to using the arts as a tool for positive social change engaging ethical and best practise methodologies.
For the last four years, we have collaborated with Tswelopele Frail Care Centre (Hillbrow), and last year invited Johannesburg Society for the Blind to create devised theatre works with our school-going participants. Themes of belonging and home, identity and music, cultural belief systems and generational curses have inspired the sharing of stories.
• For me it was extraordinary because working with grandmothers and grandfathers they give you knowledge that you have never seen before. You have never ever imagined from what they saw in apartheid and now that has… listening to their personal stories has been quite comforting.
Cast member – young@home 2017
The inter-generational project creates an alternative family. It is also a space to learn from other’s experiences and perceptions of the world we inhabit. It is about inter-generational knowledge sharing.
• I think our country has forgotten our elderly. I think this work did an incredible work in showing on how youth feel how elderly are and how energetic they are. I felt such an energy from the elderly and also such a sense of stillness and peace. I was really wonderful, thank you very much.

• Something that really touched me and I took the time is to look at every single one of the youth. And how in their eyes there is so much potential and I was just thinking that they are writing stories now that when they will be performing as elderly that they are gonna tell. And also thinking to myself that these beautiful mamas and tatas having so many beautiful stories this isn’t even their last story. They still have so many stories to experience. And this is one of them. And I was so moved by the youth

Audience comments from young@home 2017
Gcebile Dlamini, one of the theatre facilitators, has led this project since its inception. She is currently studying towards her Masters in Applied Theatre with a focus on inter-generational and creative ageing processes
Thank you to Rand Merchant Bank, Bread for the World, Ford Foundation for their generous support of our work.